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Necessary? Practical? Workable? 
The impact of the British Bill of Rights

We cannot base fundamental change to human rights law on a perception of how the Strasbourg court behaves, as opposed to the cold hard facts, writes Bambos Tsiattalou

3 November 2015

The government’s plan to repeal the ?Human Rights Act and replace it with a newly created British Bill of Rights, which will apparently meet the somewhat vague aim ?of operating closer to the cultural norms of the UK, has thrown up many more questions than answers. Not least among these questions is ?how exactly one sets about pinning down a cultural norm, let alone subjecting it to judicial interrogation. The sociological aims and implications of the plan pale in comparison ?when considering the hurdles which will have ?to be overcome if the Bill is ever to become law. 

First and foremost, we do not yet know what ?the Bill, still to be unveiled, is going to contain. There have been various hints and asides, a draft Bill produced but not published prior to the 2015 general election, and a Conservative party working paper which allow us to make a well-educated guess as to its content.     

Uncertainty surrounds the survival of the Bill,...

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