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Bloomsburry Family law

Private client

Planning Appropriate Life Interest Wills For Second Marriage Situations

Ralph Rays article (Volume 1 Issue 6) raises some interesting points on good practice and it may be helpful to look at possible areas where complaints could be raised by disappointed beneficiaries (who are only too alert these days to demanding higher standards of expertise by solicitors and other professionals).

Self Assessment for the Elderly: How Trusts will be affected

Perhaps the most common form of Will Trust, after provision for the very young, is the provision of an income for an elderly dependent, often the widow. The provision may of course be the simple grant of a life interest or, where substantial sums are involved and other considerations apply, the trustees may have certain discretions. It is estimated that a very substantial proportion of all Will Trusts are administered without professional help, and many of these may have existed for years without the need for formal annual accounts. The income from the trust investments has been mandated to the tenant for life and as often as not the investments have lain undisturbed (save for the occasional take-over or rights issue) from year to year.

The Impact of the Gloucestershire Case

With the House of Lords due to hear the Gloucestershire(1) appeal in early February, Stephen Cragg(2) rehearses some of the practical implications of the Court of Appeal decision that the judges will need to consider in their judgements.

Wills for Unmarried Partners

In the last issue of ECA, Ralph P. Ray examined the importance of providing the most appropriate Will for second marriage situations. Following on from this article Anne Edis examines the subject under the increasingly common circumstance of the partners being unmarried

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