You are here

Family practice after 
Sharland and Gohil

Deborah Levy considers the implications of the recent Supreme Court rulings for future divorce cases involving fraudulent non-disclosure

3 November 2015

Travelling on the tube ?the morning after the Supreme Court rulings ?in Sharland v Sharland [2015] UKSC 60 and Gohil v Gohil [2015] UKSC 61, I was amused by the popular press headline ‘Exes can now sue for more after historic ruling’. How accurate is this?

Mrs Sharland’s appeal centred on the impact of fraudulent non-disclosure. The facts are well established. Mr Sharland was an entrepreneur with a substantial software business shareholding; the value and manner of distribution between the parties of this shareholding were the main issues in dispute. After valuations, and on the basis ?that there were no sale plans, ?an agreement provided for Mrs Sharland to receive 30 per cent ?of net sale proceeds whenever ?it was sold, plus other assets.

After the consent order was drawn up, Mrs Sharland became aware the company was being actively prepared for an initial public offering for a substantially higher figure than it had been valued at. The Court of Ap...

Want to read on?

This article is part of our subscription-based access. Please pick one of the options below to continue.

Already registered? Login to access premium content

SUBSCRIBE for one User

Unlimited access to the entire SJ website for a full year for one user.

  • 10 issues a year delivered to you
  • Digital edition of the magazine for one user – sent to your inbox or accessible through the website
  • Access to premium content on the website
  • Access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online
  • Advanced search feature
  • Online support
  • Access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices – coming soon!
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

Subscribe

CORPORATE SUBSCRIPTION

Your department or entire firm can subscribe to Solicitors Journal online, providing easy access for all who require it. Discount corporate subscription rates apply, based on number of users.

The Corporate IP Licence includes:

  • Digital copy of the magazine sent to individuals’ inboxes and accessible through the website. Solicitors Journal publishes 10 issues per year
  • Unlimited access to premium content on the website based on IP addresses
  • Unlimited access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online (username required)
  • Unlimited access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

The Corporate IP Licence is tailored to your firm, making it the most cost effective way for the firm to access Solicitors Journal, and enables the firm to remain compliant with copyright and our Terms and Conditions. This gives you the ability to print and circulate articles within the firm.

To enquire about a Corporate IP Licence for your firm, please contact our Subscriptions Manager on emily.beechey@solicitorsjournal.com.