You are here

A call to arms

Legal aid appears to have developed a mythical status in the higher courts when deciding the pre-LASPO funding-switch cases, says Jonathan Wheeler

11 September 2019

Legal aid used to be bread and butter to lawyers like me. I was as committed to a publicly funded legal service as I was to a publicly funded health service.

To me, both were cornerstones of a properly functioning welfare state.

On completing my Law Society finals, I opted for articles at (what was then) the biggest legal aid solicitors’ firm in the country, dispensing green form advice and applying for substantive certificates which would be typed on flimsy blue paper – initially without any limitations on the amount of costs you could incur or the work you could do.

Armed with such a certificate, the playing fields were levelled. My clients could pursue claims with proper legal representation, just as the defendants could defend them through the largesse of their insurers.

Halcyon days

Alas, those were halcyon days.

The Access to Justice Act 1999 did away with legal aid for most personal injury claims, plugging the j...

Want to read on?

This article is part of our subscription-based access. Please pick one of the options below to continue.

Already registered? Login to access premium content

SUBSCRIBE for one User

Unlimited access to the entire SJ website for a full year for one user.

  • 10 issues a year delivered to you
  • Digital edition of the magazine for one user – sent to your inbox or accessible through the website
  • Access to premium content on the website
  • Access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online
  • Advanced search feature
  • Online support
  • Access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices – coming soon!
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

Subscribe

CORPORATE SUBSCRIPTION

Your department or entire firm can subscribe to Solicitors Journal online, providing easy access for all who require it. Discount corporate subscription rates apply, based on number of users.

The Corporate IP Licence includes:

  • Digital copy of the magazine sent to individuals’ inboxes and accessible through the website. Solicitors Journal publishes 10 issues per year
  • Unlimited access to premium content on the website based on IP addresses
  • Unlimited access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online (username required)
  • Unlimited access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

The Corporate IP Licence is tailored to your firm, making it the most cost effective way for the firm to access Solicitors Journal, and enables the firm to remain compliant with copyright and our Terms and Conditions. This gives you the ability to print and circulate articles within the firm.

To enquire about a Corporate IP Licence for your firm, please contact our Subscriptions Manager on emily.beechey@solicitorsjournal.com.