You are here

Gove’s nonsense: Barristers vs solicitor advocates

Greater opportunities for higher court advocacy and a blurring of lines between professions mean students are more likely to train as solicitors than barristers, argues Jeremy Robson

6 December 2016

Michael Gove’s short tenure as Lord Chancellor was, on the whole, well received by the legal profession. His understanding of the rule of law, his compassionate approach to prisons, and a willingness to repair the damage done by his hapless predecessor, the notorious Chris Grayling, earned him plaudits from across the political spectrum.

Now banished to the back benches in the post-referendum aftershocks, he clearly retains a close interest in the justice system; while his successor, Liz Truss, barely managed a few words in defence of the judiciary who ruled that invoking article 50 required parliamentary approval, Gove took to Twitter with a robust defence of the wisdom and independence of our judiciary, to the approval of many.

Gove continued in his role as the advocate of the justice system on 16 November when he delivered the Longford lecture entitled ‘What&r...

Want to read on?

This article is part of our subscription-based access. Please pick one of the options below to continue.

Already registered? Login to access premium content

SUBSCRIBE for one User

Unlimited access to the entire SJ website for a full year for one user.

  • 10 issues a year delivered to you
  • Digital edition of the magazine for one user – sent to your inbox or accessible through the website
  • Access to premium content on the website
  • Access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online
  • Advanced search feature
  • Online support
  • Access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices – coming soon!
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

Subscribe

CORPORATE SUBSCRIPTION

Your department or entire firm can subscribe to Solicitors Journal online, providing easy access for all who require it. Discount corporate subscription rates apply, based on number of users.

The Corporate IP Licence includes:

  • Digital copy of the magazine sent to individuals’ inboxes and accessible through the website. Solicitors Journal publishes 10 issues per year
  • Unlimited access to premium content on the website based on IP addresses
  • Unlimited access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online (username required)
  • Unlimited access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

The Corporate IP Licence is tailored to your firm, making it the most cost effective way for the firm to access Solicitors Journal, and enables the firm to remain compliant with copyright and our Terms and Conditions. This gives you the ability to print and circulate articles within the firm.

To enquire about a Corporate IP Licence for your firm, please contact our Subscriptions Manager on emily.beechey@solicitorsjournal.com.